Tag Archives: Motivational Speeches

Keep on Pumping – Zig Ziglar Motivation

Video Transcript:

If everybody could become an expert at anything at a drop of a hat, would there be any rewards for it? I think you have the answer, even as I ask the question.

Got a couple of good buddies that used to live down in South Alabama. Their names were Bernard Haygood and Jimmy Glenn. One day they’re out riding through the South Alabama foothills and they got a little thirsty. Bernard was the driver. He’s also the athletic one, so he hopped out of the car, he ran around to this old abandoned pump there in the back of this old farmhouse. He grabbed the handle of the pump and he started to pump. Now let me say that when old Bernard grabbed that handle and started to pump you know, since it was August and brutally hot that day, he was anxious to get some water out. So he really got after it, he was just pumping away. And after a couple of minutes he said, “Jimmy, you better get that old bucket over there and dip some water out of the creek. We gonna have to prime this pump.” All that really means is that you gotta put something in here before you can expect to get anything out, here.

The pump is really saying in another way what we’ve said so many times, and that is that you gotta be and do, before you can have. Too many people stand in front of the stove of life, and they say, “Stove now, you give me some heat, and then I’ll put some wood in you.” So many times the employee goes to the employer and says, “Now give me a raise. And when you give me the raise I’ll start coming to work on time. I’ll start doing the things you really want me to do.” What they’re saying is, “Reward me now and then later I’ll perform.” That’s not the way it works. First you’ve gotta put something in before you can expect to get anything out.

Well old Bernard wanted to drink water. But the question is, just how much pumping are you willing to do in order to get that drink of water? And after a few minutes he said, “Jimmy I just don’t believe there’s any water down there.” And Jimmy said, “Yes it is, Bernard. You know in South Alabama the wells are deep.” We’re glad they are, aren’t we? Because you see, the deeper the well, the cleaner, the sweeter, the purer, the better tasting the water is. Isn’t that another lesson the pump can teach us?

Isn’t it true that those things which have value, I mean real value, are those things which we have to work for over a period of time? Yes, it’s absolutely true. But those things which have value, which have real value, are those things which we make that honest effort to acquire. We work at it and we do a little sweating in the process. And by now, old Bernard is really beginning to sweat. I mean, it’s August, it’s hot. Finally, he just threw up his hands and he said, “Jimmy, there just ain’t no water down there.”

Jimmy said, “Don’t stop Bernard, don’t stop. If you stop, that water’s gonna go all the way back down, and then you’re gonna have to start all over.” And isn’t that the story of life?

Isn’t it true that so many people lose out on a lot of effort they’ve expended in the past, because they don’t do just a little bit more?

Keep on PUMPING

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Why perfection is unachievable – Benedict Cumberbatch

Transcript:

It’s really hard. It’s really, really hard. It’s a difficult job. You can never perfect what we do. There is no way. I’ve never met anyone who goes, “That’s perfection.” As an actor, and this isn’t mock humility, I think it just goes for all art forms really, that the whole point is perfection is unachievable.

So see lots, read lots, hear lots. Experience life as well and just keep observing. Really observing. Not just looking and seeing, but sort of observing. It’s that constant pursuit of the unobtainable which is kind of magic, really, and to keep us kind of motivated to try better. It’s the Beckett thing. Fail again, fail better.

Fail Better.

How the wisdom of a third grade dropout will change your life

Transcript:

The wisest person I ever met in my life, a third grade dropout. Wisest and dropout in the same sentence is rather oxymoronic, like jumbo shrimp. Mm-hmmm. Like Fun Run, ain’t nothing fun about it. Like Microsoft Works. You all don’t hear me.

I used to say like country music, but I’ve lived in Texas so long, I love country music now. I hunt. I fish. I have cowboy boots and cowboy… Y’all, I’m a blackneck redneck. Do you hear what I’m saying to you?

No longer oxymoronic for me to say country music, and it’s not oxymoronic for me to say third grade and dropout. That third grade dropout, the wisest person I ever met in my life, who taught me to combine knowledge and wisdom to make an impact, was my father. A simple cook, wisest man I ever met in my life, just a simple cook. Left school in the third grade to help out on the family farm, but just because he left school doesn’t mean his education stopped. Mark Twain once said: “I’ve never allowed my schooling to get in the way of my education.

My father taught himself how to read, taught himself how to write, decided in the midst of Jim Crowism, as America was breathing the last gasp of the Civil War, my father decided he was going to stand and be a man, not a black man, not a brown man, not a white man, but a man. He literally challenged himself to be the best that he could all the days of his life.

I have four degrees. My brother is a judge. We’re not the smartest ones in our family. It’s a third grade dropout daddy, a third grade dropout daddy who was quoting Michelangelo, saying to us, “Boys, I won’t have a problem if you aim high and miss, but I’m gonna have a real issue if you aim low and hit.

A country mother quoting Henry Ford, saying, “If you think you can or if you think you can’t, you’re right.” I learned that from a third grade drop. Simple lessons, lessons like these, “Son, you’d rather be an hour early than a minute late.” We never knew what time it was at my house because the clocks were always ahead. My mother said, for nearly 30 years, my father left the house at 3:45 in the morning. One day, she asked him, “Why, Daddy?” He said, “Maybe one of my boys will catch me in the act of excellence.”

I wanna share two things with you. Aristotle said, “You are what you repeatedly do.” Therefore, excellence ought to be a habit, not an act. Don’t ever forget that. I know you’re tough, but always remember to be kind, always. Don’t ever forget that. Never embarrass Mama. Mm-hmmm. If Mama ain’t happy, ain’t nobody happy. If Daddy ain’t happy don’t nobody care but you know…

Next lesson, lesson from a cook over there in the galley. “Son, make sure your servant’s towel is bigger than your ego.” Ego is the anesthesia that deadens the pain of stupidity. You all might have a relative in mind you might want to send that to. Let me say it again. Ego is the anesthesia that deadens the pain of stupidity. Pride is the burden of a foolish person. John Wooden coached basketball at UCLA for a living, but his calling was to impact people, and with all those national championships, guess what he was found doing in the middle of the week? Going into the cupboard, grabbing a broom and sweeping his own gym floor. You want to make an impact? Find your broom. Every day of your life, you find your broom. You grow your influence that way. That way, you’re attracting people so that you can impact them.

Final lesson. “Son, if you’re going to do a job, do it right.” I’ve always been told how average I can be, always been criticized about being average, but I want to tell you something. I stand here before you, before all of these people, not listening to those words, but telling myself every single day, to shoot for the stars, to be the best that I can be. Good enough isn’t good enough if it can be better, and better isn’t good enough if it can be best. Let me close with a very personal story that I think will bring all this into focus. Wisdom will come to you in the unlikeliest of sources, a lot of times through failure. When you hit rock bottom, remember this. While you’re struggling, rock bottom can also be a great foundation on which to build and on which to grow. I’m not worried that you’ll be successful. I’m worried that you won’t fail from time to time. A person that gets up off the canvas and keeps growing, that’s the person that will continue to grow their influence.

Back in the ‘70s, to help me make this point, let me introduce you to someone. I met the finest woman I’d ever met in my life. Mm-hmm. Back in my day, we’d have called her a brick house. This woman was the finest woman I’d ever seen in my life. There was just one little problem. Back them, ladies didn’t like big old linemen. The Blind Side hadn’t come out yet. They liked quarterbacks and running backs. We’re at this dance and I find out her name is Trina Williams from Lompoc, California. We’re all dancing and we’re just excited. I decide in the middle of dancing with her that I would ask her for her phone number. Trina was the first… Trina was the only woman in college who gave me her real telephone number. The next day, we walked to Baskin & Robbins Ice Cream Parlour. My friends couldn’t believe it. This has been 40 years ago, and my friends still can’t believe it. We go on a second date and a third date and a fourth date. Mm-hmm. We drive from Chico to Vallejo so that she can meet my parents. My father meets her. My daddy. My hero. He meets her, pulls me to the side and says, “Is she psycho?” But anyway. We go together for a year, two years, three years, four years. By now, Trina’s a senior in college. I’m still a freshman, but I’m working some things out. I’m so glad I graduated in four terms, Nixon, Ford, Carter, Reagan. Now, it’s time to propose, so I talk to her girlfriends, and it’s California. It’s in the ‘70s, so it has to be outside, have to have a candle and you have to have some chocolate. Listen, I’m from the hood. I had a bottle of Boone’s Farm wine. That’s what I had. She said, “Yes.” That was the key. I married the most beautiful woman I’d ever seen in my… You all ever been to a wedding and even before the wedding starts, you hear this? “How in the word?” And it was coming from my side of the family.

We get married. We have a few children. Our lives are great. One day, Trina finds a lump in her left breast. Breast cancer. Six years after that diagnosis, me and my two little boys walked up to Mommy’s casket. For two years, my heard didn’t beat. If it wasn’t for my faith in God, I wouldn’t be standing her today. If it wasn’t for those two little boys, there would have been no reason for which to go on. I was completely lost. That was rock bottom. You know what sustained me? The wisdom of a third grade dropout. The wisdom of a simple cook. We’re at the casket. I’d never seen my dad cry, but this time I saw my dad cry. That was his daughter. Trina was his daughter, not his daughter-in-law. I’m right behind my father about to see her for the last time one this Earth, and my father shared three words with me that changed my life right there at the casket. It would be the last lesson he would ever teach me.

He said, “Son, just stand.” You keep standing. No matter how rough the sea, you keep standing, and I’m not talking about just water. You keep standing. No matter what. You don’t give up. And as clearly as I’m talking to you today, these were some of her last words to me. She looked me in the eye and she said, “It doesn’t matter to me any longer how long I live. What matters to me most is how I live.” I ask you all one question, a question that I was asked all my life by a third grade dropout. How you living? How you living? Every day, ask yourself that question. How you living? Here’s what a cook would suggest you to live, this way, that you would not judge, that you would show up early, that you’d be kind, that you make sure that that servant’s towel is huge and used, that if you’re going to do something, you do it the right way. That cook would tell you this, that it’s never wrong to do the right thing, that how you do anything is how you do everything, and in that way you will grow your influence to make an impact. In that way, you will honor all those who have gone before you, who have invested in you. Look in those unlikeliest places for wisdom. Enhance your life every day by seeking that wisdom and asking yourself every night, “How am I living?”

May God richly bless you all.

MAKE AN IMPACT

Find Your Reason – Lisa Kudrow (Phoebe) Motivational Speech

Transcript:

This was my shot. I cried a lot. It was so embarrassing. I got fired from Frasier. The one everyone knew was going to be a hit, and it was. This time, it was really hard not to think that it wasn’t meant to be, my career as an actress. A couple of months later, I was almost completely out of money.

Then I got a call from a friend, the actor, Richard Kind, who said, and this is exactly how he sounds, “I’ve heard what happened. I don’t know how you get up in the morning. How do you even get out of bed, get dressed, walk out the door, and show your face?”

Yeah, I was getting up in the morning and leaving my apartment, so maybe I was coping better than I was expected to. That’s a good sign. And I understand that because the 20s, they are that time in your life when you’re really getting acquainted to self-doubt when there’s so much seemingly at stake.

So let me reassure you, it’s not supposed to be easy. You’re supposed to have moments of uncertainty about which path to take, because the 20s are full of crossroads. When one door closes, another door always opens. It really does. That’s what I would tell myself to keep those moments of doubts, only moments. And it worked. I kept going.

Then it all changed. After many auditions, I was the second person cast in the pilot called “Friends Like Us”, which would later be changed to “Friends”. Jim Burrows also directed this pilot and the first 10 episodes of friends. One day, the six of us were talking with Jimmy, exchanging the time I got fired stories, and Jimmy told them mine. “Well, she’s got the worst one of all. She got fired from Frasier. Well. It’s a good thing you got fired, or you wouldn’t have been on this show.”

He was right. It was a good thing I didn’t get Saturday Night Live. And that Romy and Michele, that that pilot didn’t work out. And every other disappointment that happened. They were actually more like guideposts that kept me on my path. Oh, and after I got fired from Frasier, I went to a birthday party and, and feeling like I had nothing at all to lose, I flirted with a guy who was way out of my league. We dated and on Thursday, Michel and I will have been married for 15 years, and we’ll celebrate with our remarkable 12-year-old son. So, thank God I got fired.

There is a reason for everything. FIND YOUR REASON

Mind Blown – This will make you rethink life

Video Transcript:

I want to show you guys something real cool. Something I just found out. Watch this.

Every pilot or flight instructor will tell you this: That if you start here, and you want to go here – to your destination – and if there’s a crosswind, you will actually land here, land lower. So what pilots do is they fly NORTH of their destination to get to their destination.

See, this metaphor applies for life, and for people as well. If you treat a person for how they are, you make them worse. You treat a person for how they could be, you promote them to what they should be. If you live life being realistic, you wind up being pessimistic. But if you live life shooting for your dreams, trying to do the impossible, ladies and gentlemen, you will wind up exactly where you need to be.

Practice being the last to speak – Simon Sinek

Transcript:

If you agree with somebody, don’t nod yes. If you disagree with somebody, don’t nod no. You will be told your whole life that you need to learn to listen. I would say that you need to learn to be the last to speak. I see it in boardrooms every day of the week. Even people who consider themselves good leaders who may actually be decent leaders, will walk into a room and say ‘Here’s the problem, here’s what I think but I’m interested in your opinion. Let’s go around the room.’ It’s too late.

The skill to hold your opinions to yourself until everyone has spoken does two things: One, it gives everybody else the feeling that they have been heard. It gives everyone else the ability to feel that they have contributed. And two, you get the benefit of hearing what everybody else has to think before you render your opinion.

The skill is really to keep your opinions to yourself. Simply sit there, take it all in and the only thing you’re allowed to do is ask questions, so that you can understand what they mean and why they have the opinion that they have. You must understand from where they are speaking, why they have the opinion they have, not just what they are saying. At the end, you will get your turn. It sounds easy, it’s not. Practice being the last to speak.

Great Leaders Inspire Action – Start with Why

Transcript:

How do you explain when things don’t go as we assume? Or better, how do you explain when others are able to achieve things that seem to defy all of the assumptions? For example: Why is Apple so innovative? Year after year, after year, after year, they’re more innovative than all their competition. And yet, they’re just a computer company. They’re just like everyone else. They have the same access to the same talent, the same agencies, the same consultants, the same media. Then why is it that they seem to have something different?

Why is it that Martin Luther King led the Civil Rights Movement? He wasn’t the only man who suffered in pre-civil rights America, and he certainly wasn’t the only great orator of the day. Why him? And why is it that the Wright brothers were able to figure out controlled, powered man flight when there were certainly other teams who were better qualified, better funded, and they didn’t achieve powered man flight, and the Wright brothers beat them to it. There’s something else at play here.

About three and a half years ago, I made a discovery. And this discovery profoundly changed my view on how I thought the world worked, and it even profoundly changed the way in which I operate in it. As it turns out, there’s a pattern. As it turns out, all the great and inspiring leaders, and organizations in the world, whether it’s Apple or Martin Luther King or the Wright brothers, they all think, act and communicate the exact same way. And it’s the complete opposite to everyone else. All I did was codify it, and it’s probably the world’s simplest idea. I call it the golden circle.

Why? How? What? This little idea explains why some organizations and some leaders are able to inspire where others aren’t. Let me define the terms really quickly. Every single person, every single organization on the planet knows what they do, 100 percent. Some know how they do it, whether you call it your differentiated value proposition or your proprietary process or your USP. But very, very few people or organizations know why they do what they do. And by “why” I don’t mean “to make a profit.” That’s a result. It’s always a result. By “why,” I mean: What’s your purpose? What’s your cause? What’s your belief? Why does your organization exist? Why do you get out of bed in the morning? And why should anyone care? As a result, the way we think, we act, the way we communicate is from the outside in, it’s obvious. We go from the clearest thing to the fuzziest thing. But the inspired leaders and the inspired organizations – regardless of their size, regardless of their industry – all think, act and communicate from the inside out.

Let me give you an example. I use Apple because they’re easy to understand and everybody gets it. If Apple were like everyone else, a marketing message from them might sound like this: “We make great computers. They’re beautifully designed, simple to use and user friendly. Want to buy one?” “Meh.” And that’s how most of us communicate. That’s how most marketing is done and how most sales are done, that’s how we communicate interpersonally. We say what we do, we say how we’re different or better and we expect some sort of a behaviour, a purchase, a vote, something like that. Here’s our new law firm: We have the best lawyers with the biggest clients, we always perform for our clients. Do business with us. Here’s our new car: It gets great gas mileage; it has leather seats. Buy our car. But it’s uninspiring.

Here’s how Apple actually communicates. “Everything we do, we believe in challenging the status quo. We believe in thinking differently. The way we challenge the status quo is by making our products beautifully designed, simple to use, and user friendly. We just happen to make great computers. Want to buy one?” Totally different, right? You’re ready to buy a computer from me. All I did was reversed the order of the information. What it proves to us is that people don’t buy what you do; people buy why you do it. People don’t buy what you do; they buy why you do it.

This explains why every single person in this room is perfectly comfortable buying a computer from Apple. But we’re also perfectly comfortable buying an MP3 player from Apple, or a phone from Apple, or a DVR from Apple. But as I said before, Apple’s just a computer company. There’s nothing that distinguishes them structurally from any of their competitors. Their competitors are all equally qualified to make all of these products. In fact, they tried. A few years ago, Gateway came out with flat-screen TVs. They’re eminently qualified to make flat-screen TVs. They’ve been making flat-screen monitors for years. Nobody bought one. And Dell, Dell came out with MP3 players and PDAs, and they make great quality products, and they can make perfectly well-designed products – and nobody bought one. In fact, talking about it now, we can’t even imagine buying an MP3 player from Dell. Why would you buy MP3 player from a computer company? But we do it every day. People don’t buy what you do; they buy why you do it. The goal is not to do business with everybody who needs what you have. The goal is to do business with people who believe what you believe.

Here’s the best part: None of what I’m telling you is my opinion. It’s all grounded in the tenets of biology. Not psychology, biology. If you look at a cross-section of the human brain, looking from the top down, what you see is that the human brain is actually broken into three major components that correlate perfectly with the golden circle. Our newest brain, our Homo Sapien brain, our neocortex, corresponds with the “what” level. The neocortex is responsible for all of our rational and analytical thought and language. The middle two sections make up our limbic brains, and our limbic brains are responsible for all of our feelings, like trust and loyalty. It’s also responsible for all human behaviour, all decision-making, and it has no capacity for language.

In other words, when we communicate from the outside in, yes, people can understand vast amounts of complicated information like features and benefits and facts and figures. It just doesn’t drive behaviour. When we communicate from the inside out, we’re talking directly to the part of the brain that controls behaviour, and then we allow people to rationalize it with the tangible things we say and do. This is where gut decisions come from. You know, sometimes you can give somebody all the facts and figures, and they say, “I know what all the facts and details say, but it just doesn’t feel right.” Why would we use that verb, it doesn’t “feel” right? Because the part of the brain that controls decision-making doesn’t control language. And the best we can muster up is, “I don’t know. It just doesn’t feel right.” Or sometimes you say you’re leading with your heart, you’re leading with your soul. I hate to break it to you, those aren’t other body parts controlling your behaviour. It’s all happening here in your limbic brain, the part of the brain that controls decision-making and not language.

But if you don’t know why you do what you do, and people respond to why you do what you do, then how will you ever get people to vote for you, or buy something from you, or, more importantly, be loyal and want to be a part of what it is that you do. Again, the goal is not just to sell to people who need what you have; the goal is to sell to people who believe what you believe. The goal is not just to hire people who need a job; it’s to hire people who believe what you believe. I always say that, you know, if you hire people just because they can do a job, they’ll work for your money, but if they believe what you believe, they’ll work for you with blood and sweat and tears. And nowhere else is there a better example than with the Wright brothers.

Most people don’t know about Samuel Pierpont Langley. And back in the early 20th century, the pursuit of powered man flight was like the dot com of the day. Everybody was trying it. And Samuel Pierpont Langley had, what we assume, to be the recipe for success. I mean, even now, you ask people, “Why did your product or why did your company fail?” and people always give you the same permutation of the same three things: under-capitalized, the wrong people, bad market conditions. It’s always the same three things, so let’s explore that. Samuel Pierpont Langley was given 50,000 dollars by the War Department to figure out this “flying machine”. Money was no problem. He held a seat at Harvard and worked at the Smithsonian and was extremely well-connected; he knew all the big minds of the day. He hired the best minds money could find and the market conditions were fantastic. The New York Times followed him around everywhere, and everyone was rooting for Langley. Then how come we’ve never heard of Samuel Pierpont Langley?

A few hundred miles away in Dayton, Ohio, Orville and Wilbur Wright, they had none of what we consider to be the recipe for success. They had no money; they paid for their dream with the proceeds from their bicycle shop. Not a single person on the Wright brothers’ team had a college education, not even Orville or Wilbur. And The New York Times followed them around nowhere.

The difference was, Orville and Wilbur were driven by a cause, by a purpose, by a belief. They believed that if they could figure out this “flying machine”, it’ll change the course of the world. Samuel Pierpont Langley was different. He wanted to be rich, and he wanted to be famous. He was in pursuit of the result. He was in pursuit of the riches. And lo and behold, look what happened. The people who believed in the Wright brothers’ dream worked with them with blood and sweat and tears. The others just worked for the pay check. They tell stories of how every time the Wright brothers went out, they would have to take five sets of parts, because that’s how many times they would crash before they came in for supper.

And, eventually, on December 17th, 1903, the Wright brothers took flight, and no one was there to even experience it. We found out about it a few days later. And further proof that Langley was motivated by the wrong thing: the day the Wright brothers took flight, he quit. He could have said, “That’s an amazing discovery, guys, and I will improve upon your technology,” but he didn’t. He wasn’t first, he didn’t get rich, he didn’t get famous, so he quit.

People don’t buy what you do; they buy why you do it. And if you talk about what you believe, you will attract those who believe what you believe. But why is it important to attract those who believe what you believe? Something called the law of diffusion of innovation, if you don’t know the law, you definitely know the terminology. The first 2.5% of our population are our innovators. The next 13.5% of our population are our early adopters. The next 34% are your early majority, your late majority and your laggards. The only reason these people buy touch-tone phones is because you can’t buy rotary phones anymore.

We all sit at various places at various times on this scale, but what the law of diffusion of innovation tells us is that if you want mass-market success or mass-market acceptance of an idea, you cannot have it until you achieve this tipping point between 15 and 18 percent market penetration, and then the system tips. I love asking businesses, “What’s your conversion on new business?” They love to tell you, “It’s about 10 percent,” proudly. Well, you can trip over 10% of the customers. We all have about 10% who just “get it.” That’s how we describe them, right? That’s like that gut feeling, “Oh, they just get it.”

The problem is: How do you find the ones that just get it before you’re doing business with them versus the ones who don’t get it? So it’s this here, this little gap that you have to close, as Jeffrey Moore calls it, “Crossing the Chasm” — because, you see, the early majority will not try something until someone else has tried it first. And these guys, the innovators and the early adopters, they’re comfortable making those gut decisions. They’re more comfortable making those intuitive decisions that are driven by what they believe about the world and not just what product is available. These are the people who stood in line for six hours to buy an iPhone when they first came out, when you could’ve just walk into the store next week and bought one off the shelf. These are the people who spent 40,000 dollars on flat-screen TVs when they first came out, even though the technology was substandard. And, by the way, they didn’t do it because the technology was so great; they did it for themselves. It’s because they wanted to be first. People don’t buy what you do; they buy why you do it and what you do simply proves what you believe. In fact, people will do the things that prove what they believe. The reason that person bought the iPhone in the first six hours, stood in line for six hours, was because of what they believed about the world, and how they wanted everybody to see them: they were first. People don’t buy what you do; they buy why you do it.

So let me give you a famous example, a famous failure and a famous success of the law of diffusion of innovation. First, the famous failure. It’s a commercial example. As we said before a second ago, the recipe for success is money and the right people and the right market conditions. Right? You should have success then. Look at TiVo. From the time TiVo came out about eight or nine years ago to this current day, they are the single highest-quality product on the market, hands down, there is no dispute. They were extremely well-funded. Market conditions were fantastic. I mean, we use TiVo as verb. I TiVo stuff on my piece-of-junk Time Warner DVR all the time.

But TiVo’s a commercial failure. They’ve never made money. And when they went IPO, their stock was at about 30 or 40 dollars and then plummeted, and it’s never traded above 10. In fact, I don’t think it’s even traded above six, except for a couple of little spikes.

Because you see, when TiVo launched their product, they told us all what they had. They said, “We have a product that pauses live TV, skips commercials, rewinds live TV and memorizes your viewing habits without you even asking.” And the cynical majority said, “We don’t believe you. We don’t need it. We don’t like it. You’re scaring us.”

What if they had said, “If you’re the kind of person who likes to have total control over every aspect of your life, boy, do we have a product for you. It pauses live TV, skips commercials, memorizes your viewing habits, etc., etc.” People don’t buy what you do; they buy why you do it, and what you do simply serves as the proof of what you believe.

Now let me give you a successful example of the law of diffusion of innovation. In the summer of 1963, 250,000 people showed up on the mall in Washington to hear Dr. King speak. They sent out no invitations, and there was no website to check the date. How do you do that? Well, Dr. King wasn’t the only man in America who was a great orator. He wasn’t the only man in America who suffered in a pre-civil rights America. In fact, some of his ideas were bad. But he had a gift. He didn’t go around telling people what needed to change in America. He went around and told people what he believed. “I believe, I believe, I believe,” he told people. And people who believed what he believed took his cause, and they made it their own, and they told people. And some of those people created structures to get the word out to even more people. And lo and behold, 250,000 people showed up on the right day on the right time to hear him speak.

How many of them showed up for him? Zero. They showed up for themselves. It’s what they believed about America that got them to travel in a bus for eight hours to stand in the sun in Washington in the middle of August. It’s what they believed, and it wasn’t about black versus white: 25% of the audience was white. Dr. King believed that there are two types of laws in this world: those that are made by a higher authority and those that are made by men. And not until all the laws that are made by men are consistent with the laws that are made by the higher authority will we live in a just world. It just so happened that the Civil Rights Movement was the perfect thing to help him bring his cause to life. We followed not him, not for him, but for ourselves. By the way, he gave the “I have a dream” speech, not the “I have a plan” speech.

Listen to politicians now, with their comprehensive 12-point plans. They’re not inspiring anybody. Because there are leaders and there are those who lead. Leaders hold a position of power or authority, but those who lead inspire us. Whether they’re individuals or organizations, we follow those who lead, not because we have to, but because we want to. We follow those who lead, not for them, but for ourselves. And it’s those who start with “why” that have the ability to inspire those around them or find others who inspire them.

Thank you very much.

P!nk response when her daughter said she is the ugliest girl she knows

Transcript:

She said to me, out of the blue: “I’m the ugliest girl I know.” And I said, “Huh?” And she was like, “Yeah, I look like a boy with long hair.” And my brain went to, “Oh my god, you’re six. Why? Where is this coming from? Who said this? Can I kick a six-year-old’s ass? Like, what?”

I went home and I made a PowerPoint presentation for her. And in that presentation were androgynous rock stars and artists that live their truth, are probably made fun of every day of their life, and carry on and wave their flag and inspire the rest of us. And these are artists like Michael Jackson, and David Bowie, and Freddie Mercury, and Annie Lenox, and Prince, and Janis Joplin, and George Michael, Elton John. So many artists. Her eyes glazed over.

But then I said: “You know, I really want to know why you feel this way about yourself.” And she said: “Well, I look like a boy.”

And I said: “Well, what do you think I look like?” And she said: “Well, you’re beautiful.” And I was like: “Well thanks!” But I said when people make fun of me, that’s what they use. They say that I look like a boy, or I’m too masculine, or I have too many opinions, or my body is too strong.

And I said to her, I said: “Do you see me growing my hair?” She said: “No mama.” I said: “Do you see me changing my body?” “No mama.” “Do you see me changing the way I present myself to the world?” “No mama.” “Do you see me selling out arenas all over the world?” “Yes mama.”

Okay, so, baby girl, we don’t change. We take the gravel and the shell and we make a pearl, and we help other people to change so that they can see more kinds of beauty. All of you, thank you for being your true selves and for lighting the way for us. I’m so inspired by you guys. Keep doing it, keep shining for the rest of us to see. And you, my darling girl, are beautiful, and I love you. Thank you guys. Good night!

Albert Einstein: Theory Of Happiness

In 1922, Albert Einstein was delivered a message from a bell boy. The story goes that he didn’t have a tip, so he just wrote down a theory of HAPPINESS and gave it to the young man. This artifact recently sold for $1.5 Million. But the advice written on the paper – is PRICELESS.

What he said in the message, was this: A calm and modest life brings more happiness than the constant pursuit of success combined with constant restlessness. Mr Special Relativity himself, arguably the smartest man who ever lived, says that a peaceful mind, and a peaceful life, is the key to happiness. This goes against many of our ideas about happiness in our society.

They constantly tell us you have to get THIS and get THAT, and STRIVE if you want to be happy. But I will explain quickly with a metaphor why Einstein is totally correct.

Say I wanted these shoes, these new Jordans right. A lot of people like Jo, like J’s right? I craved these shoes. I needed them! I started comparing my old Nike to these J’s. I started seeing everybody with them. I was miserable. And then one day, I finally got them! And I was so happy.

Now the question is: Did the J’s make me happy, or was it the release from the craving of the J’s that made me happy? It was the release! There’s nothing in Jordans that can make you happy. We often think that it’s shoes, that awards, that accolades can make us happy. But actor Jim Carrey said that: “I wish that everybody could be rich and famous, so that they can see for themselves, that that’s not the answer.”

So let’s take note of the wisdom from the great Albert Einstein. Let’s stop and smell the roses. And try to live a calm and modest life. That is… if you want to be happy. Peace.

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Rob O’Neill – How Osama bin Laden’s Hunter Never Quits

Spoiler alert. Bin Ladin dies at the end of it. We knew we weren’t coming home from that mission. We were goanna die. We’re goanna get shot down on the way in. We’re goanna run out of fuel and just be in Pakistan and live our short, miserable lives in a Pakistani prison. If anyone is goanna blow himself up, it’s Bin Ladin. We’re not coming back.

The guy that ended up in the point man position taking me up the stairs to Bin Ladin’s bedroom, he pulled me aside before we left and he said, “Don’t take this the wrong way, I’m going, but if we know we’re goanna die, why are we going?” Which is just legit. He wanted to say it out loud.

And I said, “That’s a good point. We are not going for fame and we are not going for bravado. We are going for the single mom who dropped her kids off at elementary school on a Tuesday morning, and then 45 minutes later she jumped to her death out of a skyscraper because that was a better alternative than burning alive cause it’s 2500 degrees inside. Her last gesture of human decency was to hold her skirt down so nobody could see her underwear as she committed suicide. She didn’t want to do any of that. She wasn’t supposed to be in the fight. We’re supposed to fight; that’s why we’re going.”

We were a week and a half into planning that big mission. We had some of the best minds planning the mission to kill Bin Ladin, and we rehearsed the perfect plan over and over and over every day with real helicopters on a real training site, 14 hours a day, and then afterwards we’d talk about it around a table with a replica. And one night the boss said, “All right, guys, what’s the worst thing that could happen?”

The youngest guy in the room said, “Hey, the helicopter could crash in the front yard.” He’s like, “What? Can we talk about that for 20 seconds?” And that happened. But we were able to take a potentially catastrophic event and turn it into something great because of our preparation. No matter what, we never quit.

People will be so close to a goal, 95% of the way there, have a bad day, and then throw their hands … or a series of bad days. “That’s it, I quit; I’m done.” You are not having a bad life. You’re having a bad day.

Now, saying “Never quit” and never quitting are two different things, so I need to tell you a story. You’re in the navy, so you know how to tie a lot of knots. The test is go tie a series of knots with this rope around that rope. So the instructor will say, “Go tie a bowling knot.” So you hold your breath and swim down there, tie a bowling not and you back off. It’s been about a minute. He comes back down and checks it. “Yeah, okay, that’s good.” So you untie the bowling not, you go back up, you get one breath of air, enough time for him to tell you about knot number two. So “Okay, go tie a square knot.” The test is simple. Tie five knots in a row, you pass.

They give you a certain amount of attempts at each test, but a friend of mine named John was on his last attempt. If he doesn’t do all five right now, they’re goanna kick him out today. He’ll never be a Seal. Lifelong dream, that’s a lot of pressure. On his fifth knot attempt, he drowned, so the instructor swam down to get him. He straddled John and started immediately with a sternum rub trying to get him to cough it up, then he started CPR, and we could actually hear him saying to John, “Come back to the light.” So John was out for a minute and a half, finally spit up all the water out of his lungs, and the first words out of his mouth were, “Did I pass?” So the instructor kind of sat back on him, and he’s getting his colour back too because he gets to keep his job, and he goes, “Yeah, man, you passed.” And John goes, “Thank God, I finally got the fifth knot.” And the instructor said, “Well no, you didn’t. Look, I’m in a good mood right now so I’m goanna let you in on a secret. I don’t care how many knots you know how to tie. That is not part of the curriculum to become a Navy Seal. My job simply is to see how far you’ll push yourself. You just killed yourself. You passed the goddamn test. Good job.”

When you feel like quitting, which you will, don’t quit right now. Quit tomorrow. Wake up in the morning on time and make your bed the right way and brush your teeth. Little victories. Make it to 5 a.m. PT on time. Get through that and make it to breakfast. After breakfast, concentrate on getting to lunch. After lunch, make it to dinner. After dinner, do everything you need to do to get back in that bed. No matter how bad your day was, you get a fresh start tomorrow because your bed was made right. And the enemy is all your doubts, all your fears, and everyone you know back home that told you you weren’t good enough to do this. Keep your head down. No matter what, never quit, and you’ll be just fine. KEEP MOVING FORWARD.